Wired All Wrong: Break Out The Battle Tapes

Wired All Wrong

Break Out The Battle Tapes

Nitrus

 F 

Wired All Wrong - Break Out The Battle TapesWired All Wrong are Jeff Turzo from God Lives Underwater, and Matt Mahaffey from the less-recognizable Self. The two, drawn by some mystical force, decided it would be a really good idea to make music together. It is to wonder.

Most of the tracks on the record come off like a coked-up Head Automatica, or maybe a half-hearted radio version of Mindless Self Indulgence. Moments of early-’90s funkiness come through, but there is still something dated in the band’s approach—the wires, you might say, are all wrong.

Try as I might, I have a hard time picturing anyone actually listening to this and enjoying it. The “guitar” tone is compressed and even on the tracks like “Medicate,” where it’s more prominently featured, uninspired. The ready use of keyboards and samples does little to enhance the songs, and really, the whole affair smacks of a cynical cash grab from a couple guys trying too hard to prove their relevance.

Future fodder for the bargain bins.

In A Word: Irredeemable

—by , September 13, 2006

    reader responses
  1. Are you Freaking kidding? Compressed or not, this is one of the best albums I have heard in years. From “15 minutes” and its catchy refrain, to “End of All Things,” I have played this album as though it was one long playing single.

    It is refreshing and original, with heavy guitar in places where there should be funk and funk in areas that I thought would be rock. It is completely out of the ordinary and takes the listener by surprise.

    How can you disdain that bassline in Medicate? It’s freaking unbelievable!!!!

    Granted, I first heard of this band on itunes during a week of free downloads of “Nothing at all” which I immediately loved, I bought the album 2 years later and I have to admit, it is truly one of the best I’ve heard in a long time.

    rwillis on 1/30/2009 at 04:18 AM 


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