Nashville Pussy @ Rocks Off Concert Cruise

Nashville Pussy

Rocks Off Concert Cruise

April 8, 2010

NEW YORK HARBOR, NY—While this is the tenth year of the Rocks Off Concert Cruise, I must admit, I had never been on one until 2010. Being a picky bastard, if I’m going to a show just to see an opener, I like to leave early, or if I’m just going for a headliner, I’m happy to arrive late. No can do on a boat, unless you feel like swimming. So the concert cruise experience always seemed like it would be a chore.

I couldn’t have been more wrong.

The low culture evening of Nashville Pussy, Green Jelly and Psychostick—with only the cleavaged Nashville Pussy having a modicum of seriousness in their Southern psychobilly metal songs about sex, fighting and drinking—was a wonderful and bizarre counterpoint to an unseasonably warm evening floating along the East River and around the tip of Manhattan. It was such a dirty, juvenile and bawdy night of rock and roll I could only imagine a large floating dildo would have been a more unpleasant sore in New York Harbor for the powers-that-be, and that’s more than enough to put a smile on my face.

I had forgotten about Psychostick, the “humorcore” band with songs titled “ABCDeath,” “This Is Not A Song, It’s A Sandwich,” “Scrotal-Torrent,” and “Beer!!!” They’re either so bad they’re good or so bad they’re really bad, depending on who you are, and there is some silly humor to be had there. I must admit, I spent most of their set upstairs having the music pumped through the PA. Getting up close and personal for that kind of thing is definitely for fans only.

After that, Green Jelly. Or at least I thought it would be Green Jelly. It turned out to be the Fabulous Miss Wendy, who played a few quick rock songs, including a curiously chosen cover of “Kick Out The Jams.” She mostly seemed to be drawing a crowd because she played solos while writhing around on the ground in little more than a bikini top and tight jeans. For this crowd, that was more than enough.

It seemed they were on the bill because she was actually playing lead for Green Jelly, who’s too-short set was up next and really highlighted how cramped the space was given their elaborate costumes. “Obey The Cowgod” got a righteous response from the audience, with the Jelly-literate crowd getting on their knees for the bridge. “Electric Harley House Of Love” and “Three Little Pigs” were the other highlights, with two lesser-known songs between that mostly served as time for Bill Manspeaker to change costumes.

Finally, Nashville Pussy was up as the boat turned back toward the harbor. Mostly supporting From Hell To Texas, they started a bit late due to technical difficulties, and with that in mind, they burned right through their set, taking no time to talk. Boat’s gotta dock, you know. Nashville Pussy songs seem to be interchangeable as far as topics go “High As Hell” versus “I’m So High” or “Drunk Driving Man” against “Dead Man Can’t Get Drunk,” it’s good time rock that really doesn’t require much of an explanation. For all I know, they could have played all of them or none of them. I’m pretty sure “Speed Machine” made an appearance, as did “Ain’t Your Business,” but by the time they were headed back to the docks, the effects of the booze cruise were in full swing, and it all sounded good to me.

—by , May 5, 2010


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