As a music lover, I find it hard to understand Forsyth’s vision for the instrumental record, Kenzo Deluxe. Yes, the ambient guitar thing is super trendy right now, and yes, I get the allure. However, when there aren’t any lyrics, the music has to be emotionally flooring. A certain passion needs to burst from the seams and into your ears. Making 10-minute songs is also a little unnecessary. Being different is cool, I’m all for it. Being different and interesting is a whole other feat.

While the guitar on “The First 10 Minutes Of Cocksucker Blues” is captivating, the remainder of the song falls short. The beginning seems hypnotic and has a heavy psychedelic presence. You’re gradually pushed into a relaxed state of mind, as the rhythmic tunes enter your brain. After your musical trip is over, it comes to a quiet end.

“Downs & Ups,” does exactly as the title says. As it softly begins, the song quickly fulfills its title description. Softly ascending, only to descend to a somber state. The previous are musically well done, but the interest level isn’t very high. Even though the guitar pedals used in “Boston Street Lullaby No. 2” are very hazy and rock and roll, the sound becomes repetitive after the first two minutes.

Speaking of repetitive, the 11-minute song that follows is a tad too long. There is a small section midway through it, which gives the listeners a brief break at the hands of a different chord progression. Regardless, it’s redundant. The last track, “Boston Street Lullaby No.1” serves as a decent closer. It’s relaxing due to the echoing chords and minimal effects. This record isn’t something I’d put on constantly, but it’s not badly done. Forsyth is undoubtedly talented in his field, and that’s not something to be looked over.

In A Word: Trippy

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